PacketLoss

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November 20, 2008, at 01:36 PM EST by 128.238.244.227 -
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November 20, 2008, at 01:35 PM EST by 128.238.244.227 -
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Related Publications:

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Related Publications:

1. Tao Liu, Yao Wang, Jill M. Boyce, Zhenyu Wu, and Hua Yang, "Subjective Quality Evaluation of Decoded Video in the Presence of Packet Losses", ICASSP, 2007

2. Tao Liu, Yao Wang, Jill M. Boyce, Hua Yang, and Zhenyu Wu," A Novel Video Quality Metric for Low Bit-rate Video Considering Both Coding and Packet-loss Artifacts", Special Issue on Visual Media Quality Assessment, IEEE Journal of Selected Topics in Signal Processing, April, 2009, to be published

November 20, 2008, at 01:27 PM EST by 128.238.244.227 -
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In order to solve this challenging problem, we examined the impact of several factors on the perceptual quality, including the error length, the loss severity, loss location, the number of losses, and loss patterns. Based on our findings, we proposed an objective metric for the quality degradation due to packet losses that considers all these factors. We also validate a prior metric relating the quality degradation due to compression artifacts and the PSNR. We finally propose a full-reference metric that measures the overall quality degradation due to both packet losses and lossy compression. The proposed metric correlates very well with subjective ratings, for a large set of video clips with different loss patterns, coding artifacts, and scene contents.

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In order to solve this challenging problem, we examined the impact of several factors on the perceptual quality, including the error length, the loss severity, loss location, the number of losses, and loss patterns. Based on our findings, we proposed an objective metric for the quality degradation due to packet losses that considers all these factors. We also validate a prior metric relating the quality degradation due to compression artifacts and the PSNR. We finally propose a full-reference metric that measures the overall quality degradation due to both packet losses and lossy compression. The proposed metric correlates very well with subjective ratings, for a large set of video clips with different loss patterns, coding artifacts, and scene contents.

This project is supported by WICATT and Thomson Corporate Research, NJ.

Related Publications:

November 20, 2008, at 01:25 PM EST by 128.238.244.227 -
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In typical wireless video communication systems, because the encoded video is transmitted with limited bandwidth and transmission is likely over an error-prone channel, received videos are generally greatly degraded due to both compression and channel loss. Because of the use of motion-compensated temporal prediction, a single packet loss can affect many subsequent frames (known as error propagation). The perceptual quality of a decoded video depends on many factors, including the encoder settings (e.g. the quantization parameter and the GOP length), the loss pattern (number, duration, and location of loss-affected frames), and the video content. The interactions among these factors render the development of accurate objective quality metrics a highly challenging problem.

In the absence of transmission loss, the commonly used Peak-Signal-to-Noise-Ratio (PSNR) has been found to correlate reasonably well with perceived quality of video encoded at an intermediate bit-rate range. Over a larger range of the PSNR, one can still predict the perceptual quality from the PSNR quite well using a sigmoidal function mapping. However, when the videos are encoded at low bit rates, and transmitted over an error-prone network, these metrics do not work very well. Developing accurate objective quality metrics for videos affected by significant coding artifacts and/or substantial packet losses is currently an active research area.

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In typical wireless video communication systems, because the encoded video is transmitted with limited bandwidth and transmission is likely over an error-prone channel, received videos are generally greatly degraded due to both compression and channel loss. Because of the use of motion-compensated temporal prediction, a single packet loss can affect many subsequent frames (known as error propagation). The perceptual quality of a decoded video depends on many factors, including the encoder settings (e.g. the quantization parameter and the GOP length), the loss pattern (number, duration, and location of loss-affected frames), and the video content. The interactions among these factors render the development of accurate objective quality metrics a highly challenging problem.

In order to solve this challenging problem, we examined the impact of several factors on the perceptual quality, including the error length, the loss severity, loss location, the number of losses, and loss patterns. Based on our findings, we proposed an objective metric for the quality degradation due to packet losses that considers all these factors. We also validate a prior metric relating the quality degradation due to compression artifacts and the PSNR. We finally propose a full-reference metric that measures the overall quality degradation due to both packet losses and lossy compression. The proposed metric correlates very well with subjective ratings, for a large set of video clips with different loss patterns, coding artifacts, and scene contents.

November 20, 2008, at 01:20 PM EST by 128.238.244.227 -
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Testing

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November 20, 2008, at 01:10 PM EST by 128.238.244.227 -
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Testing

Page last modified on November 20, 2008, at 01:36 PM EST